Days of the Week – Easter Bunny Theme

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Classroom Days of the Week Labels – FREE & Printable – add these cute bunny signs to your classroom display area to reinforce the days of the week  🙂

Days of the Week Signs

FREE & PRINTABLE Easter Bunny Themed Labels 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday

Learning the days of the week and their order is a skill many children acquire early in their school career. 

Here is a set of Free Printable Easter Bunny Themed Set of Days of the Week Cards to add a little color to this experience. Once printed, these cards can be used as a visual reminder or retrieval chart for students. 

 

Days of the Week Display Signs

Days of the Week Display Signs

Display Ideas: 

  • Stick them on a class made Wall Display 
  • Extend the activity by adding signs to complement the printable ones. ‘Today is….’, ‘Yesterday was…’, ‘Tomorrow will be…’ 
  • Some like to have this small display on the classroom door so it is seen when entering the room, leaving the room & daydreaming 😉 
  • Great for the fridge – homeschoolers like to pin these cards to the fridge
  • Send home the web address of these labels in the school newsletter and encourage parents and carers to print them out for use at home.
  • Display all the Days of the Week cards vertically in order to form a mini poster
  • Incorporate the cards into a Vocabulary Word Wall. 

Change Up Your Days of the Week Signs:

As part of the morning routine, many teachers like to change the sign each day to reinforce the days of the week.
Feel free to choose our printable Easter Bunny signs as your go-to sign but remember to check out all out other free Days of the Week Signs. We have Fairy, Australian animals, Cute Animals, Dinosaurs, Mermaids, Owls & St Patrick’s Day themes to choose from.

Activities for Learning the Days of the Week:

  • What Do You Do On…? A Think Pair Share – Students pair up and sit facing. The teacher asks, ‘What activity do you ONLY do on (insert day of the week)?’ – Students tell each other an activity they do on that day and relay it to their partner. The teacher asks a couple of students to share with the class what their partner does. This way the activity is a listening & retelling one. I like to ask for ‘victims’… (Do a double-take)… I mean ‘volunteers’ 😉 to tell of something interesting or unique that might have come up.
  • Find some Days of the Week Songs on Youtube – Be warned. Some of them are truly awful 😉 This Addams’ Family one is always a hit. 
  • Loud Soft Game – One student goes outside the room for a moment while another student hides the card for the current day of the week somewhere in the classroom. The student who hid the card then sits back with the group and the other student returns to the room. The class begins to sing The Addam’s Family Days of the week song softly. The student who was outside has to find the card based on how loudly the class is singing. If the Finder is walking towards the hidden card the class get gradually louder. As the Finder is getting further away… the class sings more softly. The Finder uses the dynamics of the music to find the card. Once found, the Finder holds the card above their head triumphant while the rest of the class applaud. This really is a game students enjoy. N.B It can get very noisy as the group get excited. 
  • Take Turns Saying – In pairs, students say the days of the week alternatively beginning with the random day the teacher calls out. You might like to vary this and have the teacher say a day and the class call back the as a response the next day. e.g. Teacher = Thursday. Class = Friday etc.
  • Sequencing Activity –  a pair versus pair game. Print out 2 sets of the Days of the Week Cards – Two pairs of students stand with one set of cards spread out randomly on a table. On ‘Go’ the teams sort all the cards into their correct order. N.B a calendar may help with this activity. The first team to have the cards in order wins.
  • A Bit of Fun – Blu-tac the cards to a few different places around the room. Have a group of 4 students stand in the middle of the room. Instruct them to be very, very careful when moving around the room. The teacher calls out a day e.g. Sunday. The first child to touch that sign… BY ONLY WALKING TO IT… wins a point. Decide how many rounds you would like to play before giving another group of students a turn. Have the rest of the class pretend they are playing the round in their heads as a way to practice for when they get a turn. ‘Where would you WALK QUICKLY to?’
  • Read books based on the Days of the Week. For me ‘The Very Hungry Caterpillar’ is a little overdone so ask your librarian for other options to complement it.
  • There are many book reads and animations on YouTube. Explore a few with your class and get them to evaluate which ones they think are best for learning the order of the days of the week e.g. ‘Days of the Week with Sid & His Sheep’.
  • As a whole class create three separate label cards for “Yesterday was…”, “Today is…” and “Tomorrow will be…”. Attach these to the wall and each day change the days of the week. 
Preparation: 
 
I like to print these on 200 weight paper so they are a little more solid than normal printer paper. I then tend to laminate them to extend their longevity. 

In This Download: 

4 Days of the Week signs print out on a single piece of paper. – Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday.

How to Download Your Free Days of the Week Classroom Sign:

  1. Add the Easter Bunny Days of the Week Sign to your Cart using the ‘Add to Cart’ Button. NB You can only get the resources 2 at a time. #longstory
  2. Press the very small ‘View Cart’ button at the very top right of this page.
  3. Press the ‘Proceed to Checkout’ Button
  4. Add your email address to prove you are human 
  5. Press ‘Place Order’ and then scroll down to ‘Order Details’ and click on your resource there. It will open ready to save, print, cut out and display.

Where to Next:

How about Free Bulletin Letters or a FREE Sight Word Game

or some Math Game Spinners or maybe a Collection of Reading Games
interactive hundreds chart

or maybe something completely different –  an Interactive Hundreds Chart with ‘freakin’ lasers’